Friday, April 18, 2014

Living History: Greek immigrant found her calling as a midwife

Read this story about a Greek woman who became a midwife and also helped many others in the Utah area she settled in.    - - Donna Poisl

By Eileen Hallet Stone | The Salt Lake Tribune

In the early 20th century, streams of Greek men as young as 14 poured into Utah to work the mines, smelters, mills, rail yards and road beds. Hoping to earn steady wages and return to their homeland, these immigrants lived in tents, powder-box shacks, railroad cars and crowded boarding houses. By 1910 they numbered more than 4,000. Greek women immigrants numbered fewer than 10. Among them was a midwife known as Magerou.

Georgia Lathouris lived in a small Peloponnesian village in southern Greece. One afternoon while walking into a mountain pasture where her family was tending goats, the 14-year-old heard a woman shouting. The woman, pregnant, was harvesting wheat, experienced contractions and was unable to get down the mountain. Taking the mother-to-be into a nearby cave, Georgia delivered a healthy baby and discovered a profession.
Click on the HEADLINE above to read the rest of this story! This is only a small part of it.

No comments: